VACATION.

britishfilminstitute:

Tilda Swinton in Derek Jarman’s The Last of England

from 山椒大夫 / Sansho Dayu, Kenji Mizoguchi, 1954

(Source: mexq)

giradiscosestragados:


Old Man:  When young, we mourn for one woman… as we grow old, for women in general. The tragedy of life is that man is never free yet strives for what he can never be. The thing most ferared in secret always happens. My life, my loves, where are they now? But the more the pain grows, the more this instinct for life somehow asserts itself. The necessary beauty in life is in giving yourself to it completely. Only later will it clarify itself and become coherent.
Slacker (1991), a film by Richard Linklater.

giradiscosestragados:

Old Man:  When young, we mourn for one woman… as we grow old, for women in general. The tragedy of life is that man is never free yet strives for what he can never be. The thing most ferared in secret always happens. My life, my loves, where are they now? But the more the pain grows, the more this instinct for life somehow asserts itself. The necessary beauty in life is in giving yourself to it completely. Only later will it clarify itself and become coherent.

Slacker (1991), a film by Richard Linklater.

(via tarantinologist)

Drinking Buddies

(Source: charmedbyred, via ericrohmer)

chadhartigan:

“The Third Part of the Night begins with the apocalypse of St. John read by an actress—it is right in the middle of something, not the beginning! Beginnings are useless. You know how today every French film starts with a girl riding her bicycle. While she rides and rides, you have all the credits, and when she arrives you forget the bicycle, which is of no use anymore, and only then something starts. I don’t want to use that bicycle!”
- Andrzej Żuławski from a 2012 interview with Mubi

chadhartigan:

The Third Part of the Night begins with the apocalypse of St. John read by an actress—it is right in the middle of something, not the beginning! Beginnings are useless. You know how today every French film starts with a girl riding her bicycle. While she rides and rides, you have all the credits, and when she arrives you forget the bicycle, which is of no use anymore, and only then something starts. I don’t want to use that bicycle!”

- Andrzej Żuławski from a 2012 interview with Mubi

howverypleb:

Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)

(via chungkinghotel)

mabellonghetti:

Poster for Abbas Kiarostami’s Certified Copy// Copie Conforme (2010)

(via torranceoulogan)

howverypleb:

Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)

(via chungkinghotel)